Travel tricks/Hacks For your Air Travel

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When you buy an airline ticket you have entered into a contract with the airline you are flying. As with any contract, you have a right to a copy of the rules. With international flights, the contract is called “tariff rules.”

Do the Bump

The term “bumped” means that even with a confirmed reservation and ticket, there is no room on the flight for you. This is usually because most airlines overbook their flights. If all the passengers show up, the airline’s first move will be to ask for volunteers to take another flight. The incentive is usually monetary vouchers for future flights. Before volunteering, consider several issues.

*Find out when you will get a confirmed seat on a flight to your destination.

*Find out the restrictions on your voucher.

*See what added perks are included. Meals, phone calls, or hotel rooms for long delays may be included.

If the airline cannot get enough volunteers they will resort to Involuntary Bumping. At this point, they will take some flyers off the flight. Usually, the toss of the coin falls to the last couple of flyers that checked in, or flyers that do not have assigned seats or did not reconfirm a flight.  It helps to be a member of an airline mileage club.

If this happens to you, you could be eligible to receive compensation for missing your flight. To qualify, there are several conditions that must be met.

*You must have a confirmed reservation that fits the deadline for purchase.

*The deadline for check-in has been met. (Ask your airline what their deadline is)

Where’s my Free Ticket?

For compensation for passengers who are bumped from US domestic flights. If your airline can get you to your destination within one hour of your original time, no compensation is due. If the airline gets you on a plane in 1 or 2 hours, it must compensate you the cost of a one-way fare, up to $200. If it takes longer than 2 hours, you are entitled to double the one-way fare, up to $400. On international flights, the airline has up to 4 hours to get you on a flight. Overseas amounts are determined by the tariff rules.

Join an airline’s Frequent Flyer’s Program

Okay, you have had to spend big dollars for a hotel or a missed vacation due to an airline problem! Where do you go and how do you work out some satisfaction? Here is a big tip, always join an airline’s Frequent Flyer’s Program — before flying. It costs nothing, and even if you may not fly the airline ever again, join. Airlines are very competitive when it comes to customers; your intention to become a frequent customer will tip the satisfaction in your favor.

Clear your cache to spend less cash.

Clearing out your browser cache and cookies in between searches for tickets will make sure you’re getting the newest — and potentially cheapest — prices.

Don’t be afraid to ask for free things.

Airlines often offer upgrades to business or first class the day of your scheduled flight. There may not be any upgrades available, but it’s worth a shot to ask the ground crew.

 

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